There are eight (8) Goals for the Millennium Development Goals that were set in 2000 to be achieved by 2015. Did governments achieve those goals? Nothing is sure since funds are always embezzled to other non-clear destinations. Among those eight (8) goals; six (6) are nutrition related. That explains; nutrition is an important factor of achievement of the MDGs. “Nutrition is also central to the achievement of the MDGs. Directly or indirectly, nutrition is related to almost all of these goals” (R. Skolnik 2012). We can therefore affirm without risk of mistakes that without substantial improvement of nutrition, there is no Millennium Development Goals.
As a reminder; here are the eight (8) Goals of The Millennium Development for 2015:
1 Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger
2 Achieve universal primary education
3 Promote gender equality and empower women
4 Reduce child mortality
5 Improve maternal health
6 Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases
7 Ensure environmental sustainability
8 Develop a global partnership for development (UNDP)

The first following six (6) are nutrition related:
1 Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger
2 Achieve universal primary education
3 Promote gender equality and empower women
4 Reduce child mortality
5 Improve maternal health
6 Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases

Here is the relationship between each goal with the MDGs according to R. Skolnik; Key Links Between Nutrition and The Millennium Development Goals: (R. Skolnik 2012; source: Adated from United Nations. Millennium Development Goals. Available at: http://www.un.org/millenninumgoals/goals.)
Goal 1: Eradicate Poverty and Hunger
Link: Poor nutritional status is both a cause and a consequence of poverty. Improving income and nutritional status will improve the status.
Goal 2: Achieve Universal Primary Education
Link: Children who are properly nourished enroll in school at higher rates than undernourished children, attend school for more years, and perform better while they are there than undernourished children.
Goals 3: Promote Gender Equality and Empower Women
Link: Women suffer very high rates of some nutritional deficiencies, such as iron deficiency anemia, that constrain their health and their productivity. Improving the nutritional status of women will enhance their income earning potential and ability to be more productive in all of their work.
Goals 4: Reduce Child Mortality
Link: About 35 percent of all child deaths worldwide are associated with malnutrition. It will not be possible to make major strides in reducing child mortality without significant improvements in the nutritional status of young children.
Goals 5: Improve Maternal Health
Link: Maternal Health and pregnancy outcomes are intimately connected to the nutritional status of the pregnant women.
Goal 6: Combat HIV/AIDS, Malaria, and Other Diseases
Link: Poor nutritional status makes people more susceptible to illness and to being sick for long periods of time. Good nutrition is especially important for people suffering from some health conditions, such as TB and HIV/AIDS. Supplementation with some micronutrients, even in the absence of antiretroviral therapy, can lengthen the time that HIV – positive people can go without progressing to full-blown AIDS.

The United States has a similar program called: The Healthy People 2020. That program is concentrated on four (4) objectives. The CDC stated that; “Healthy People 2020 is the federal government’s prevention agenda for building a healthy nation. It is a statement of national health objectives designed to identify the most significant preventable threats to health and to establish national goals to reduce theses. The vision of Healthy People 2020 is to have a society in which all people live long, healthy lives.” “The overarching goals of Healthy People 2020 are to: attain high-quality, longer lives free of preventable disease, disability, injury, and premature death; achieve health equity, eliminate disparities, and improve the health of all groups; create social and physical environments that promote good health for all; and promote quality of life, healthy development, and healthy behaviors across all life stages.”
As we know that developing countries would always have problems to achieve goals that have been assigned to them from external sources like from the United Nations; therefore, they should perform their own similar programs that they can efficiently implement. That approach should be more efficient than accepting programs imposed to them just to get the funds they embezzle or that they can route toward other blurred destinations.

FOOD FOR ALL: Let’s FEED FOR HOPE.
Mohamed Elmahady CAMARA

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